The SuGAr, and tectonics of the Sumatra subduction zone
The SuGAr, and tectonics of the Sumatra subduction zone

The Sumatra GPS Array is a 60-station continuous GPS network designed to measure tectonic deformation along the Sumatra subduction zone. It has recorded a great many earthquakes, and their ensuing postseismic deformation, in the last decade. Our group has been working to unravel the overlapping signals from all these events, search for slow-slip events in the SuGAr data, and study the many moderate to large earthquakes that have been recorded by this network.

The SuMo GPS network and the Sumatran Fault
The SuMo GPS network and the Sumatran Fault

SuMo is a dense campaign and semi-permanent 85-station GPS network designed to better understand the Sumatran Fault.

Modeling long-term tectonic deformation recorded by corals
Modeling long-term tectonic deformation recorded by corals

Coral microatolls record relative sea-level changes (and thus land-height changes) and can therefore help us to extend our geodetic measurements back in time. We have been working on modeling the coral data, documenting a 15-year-long slow-slip event and significant changes in the interseismic deformation rates of Sumatra over the last 1000 years.

Seafloor geodesy using Wave Gliders
Seafloor geodesy using Wave Gliders

This project aims to better resolve tectonic processes at the Sumatra subduction zone using acoustic GPS and wave-powered marine robots.

The MIBB GPS network
The MIBB GPS network

The Myanmar-India-Bangladesh-Bhutan network was designed to monitor the broadscale tectonic deformation of South and Southeast Asia.  The time series are now getting long enough that in the next year our group will start work on modeling the regional kinematics recorded by this network.

Subsiding deltas, sinking cities, and sea-level rise
Subsiding deltas, sinking cities, and sea-level rise

Many large cities in SE Asia are situated in low-lying coastal areas and are experiencing rapid subsidence as a result of groundwater withdrawal. We are using InSAR to monitor and try to better understand these effects. We are also studying tectonic impacts on relative sea level around the region.

The SuGAr, and tectonics of the Sumatra subduction zone
The SuMo GPS network and the Sumatran Fault
Modeling long-term tectonic deformation recorded by corals
Seafloor geodesy using Wave Gliders
The MIBB GPS network
Subsiding deltas, sinking cities, and sea-level rise
The SuGAr, and tectonics of the Sumatra subduction zone

The Sumatra GPS Array is a 60-station continuous GPS network designed to measure tectonic deformation along the Sumatra subduction zone. It has recorded a great many earthquakes, and their ensuing postseismic deformation, in the last decade. Our group has been working to unravel the overlapping signals from all these events, search for slow-slip events in the SuGAr data, and study the many moderate to large earthquakes that have been recorded by this network.

The SuMo GPS network and the Sumatran Fault

SuMo is a dense campaign and semi-permanent 85-station GPS network designed to better understand the Sumatran Fault.

Modeling long-term tectonic deformation recorded by corals

Coral microatolls record relative sea-level changes (and thus land-height changes) and can therefore help us to extend our geodetic measurements back in time. We have been working on modeling the coral data, documenting a 15-year-long slow-slip event and significant changes in the interseismic deformation rates of Sumatra over the last 1000 years.

Seafloor geodesy using Wave Gliders

This project aims to better resolve tectonic processes at the Sumatra subduction zone using acoustic GPS and wave-powered marine robots.

The MIBB GPS network

The Myanmar-India-Bangladesh-Bhutan network was designed to monitor the broadscale tectonic deformation of South and Southeast Asia.  The time series are now getting long enough that in the next year our group will start work on modeling the regional kinematics recorded by this network.

Subsiding deltas, sinking cities, and sea-level rise

Many large cities in SE Asia are situated in low-lying coastal areas and are experiencing rapid subsidence as a result of groundwater withdrawal. We are using InSAR to monitor and try to better understand these effects. We are also studying tectonic impacts on relative sea level around the region.

show thumbnails